Size: 24x18 inches
Substrate: Premium matte
Bleed: full bleed, image goes edge to edge
 
About This Piece: This phto by Baldus features the iconic spire, newly rebuilt at the time. The original spire was constructed in the 13th century, probably between 1220 and 1230. It was battered, weakened and bent by the wind over five centuries, and finally was removed in 1786. During the 19th century restoration, Eugène Viollet-le-Duc decided to recreate it, making a new version of oak covered with lead. The entire spire weighed 750 tons. Following Viollet-le-Duc's plans, the spire was surrounded by copper statues of the twelve Apostles, in four groups of three, one group at each point of the compass. Each of the four groups were preceded by an animal symbolising one of the four evangelists: a steer for Saint Luke, a lion for Saint Mark, an eagle for Saint John and an angel for Saint Matthew. Prior to the spire's collapse, all of the statues looked at Paris, except one; the statue of Saint Thomas, the patron saint of architects, looked at the spire, and had the features of Viollet-le-Duc.